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5 answers to standard interview questions

4/3/2019

5 great answers to standard interview questions

Interviews can be a little nerve-racking for any candidate, especially those who haven't gone through many in recent years. With that in mind, knowing some of the most common questions you're likely to be asked will help you feel more prepared for anything else an interviewer might throw at you.

Here are five standard interview questions, and the best way to answer them:

1) "Can you tell me a bit about yourself?"

This question is in almost every interview and can be difficult to answer, according to The Balance Careers. The trick to getting it right is giving enough information about yourself personally without "oversharing," while simultaneously not providing too little information. You should be prepared to talk about one or two of your interests or hobbies to showcase your personality, but then return to talking business.

2) "Why should we hire you instead of another candidate?"

This is another "getting it just right" question because you don't want to come off too modest or overly boastful. Work on an answer to this question that shows you have real skills and legitimate qualifications while also noting that you've worked with great people who've helped you develop your capabilities over time.

3) "Where do you see yourself in five years?"

Companies want to know you're not going to leave them within a year or two of being hired, so this is a common question, according to Job Hunt. Talking about how you may want to develop skills so you can move up in the organization is a good idea, but so too is talking about how you plan to use your various skills to help the company itself grow and succeed over that period. When the focus isn't just on you personally, you may become a more enticing candidate.

4) "Why do you want to work here?"

Yet another rather abstract question. Hiring managers want to make sure you're truly engaged with what the company is doing and excited for this specific opportunity, and they may be testing to see if your enthusiasm is genuine. They also, of course, want to hear why you're enthusiastic in your own words.

5) "What are your weaknesses as a worker?"

This is always a bit of a tricky question because you don't want to oversell yourself ("Some people say I work too hard") or say something overly negative ("I can struggle with motivation"), as noted by Inc. magazine. The ideal way of walking that fine line is by picking something you do have to work on, but to quickly note how you're already actively working on it. That way, a hiring manager will see you've identified a real problem and also feel good about the solution itself.

The more you can do to familiarize yourself with some of the questions you're most likely to get during your interview, the better prepared you will be to knock your answers out of the park.

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